Framing Great Landscapes in Utah’s Wasatch Mountains

When a Texas-based family commissioned architect Warren Lloyd of Lloyd Architects to create their home near Utah’s Wasatch Mountains, they envisioned an open and welcoming respite for themselves and their children that connected to the surrounding natural area. The couple desired a place that offered an escape for their children and themselves in an unfussy yet elevated style that allowed optimal views of the mountains and Deer Valley area beyond.

Categories

  • Residential

Products

  • Simulated Steel
  • Performance Line
  • Multi-slide door
  • Windows

Location

  • Utah

“We thought less about a style for the house and more of a feel and character that the space would be for the family,” says Lloyd, who, with his Salt Lake City based firm, sought to design the Utah mountain retreat to evoke an emotional response. Lloyd selected Western Window Systems Simulated Steel Line for the windows and doors because of its style-neutral, slim profile and energy efficiency.

Fixed windows eliminate the barrier to the outdoor patio views.

Fixed windows eliminate the barrier to the outdoor patio views.

Preservation and energy efficiency.

The home is located in Victory Ranch, a luxury master-planned community in Kamas situated along the Provo River. The development’s site plan is designed to preserve the natural areas and lessen construction’s environmental impact as much as possible. Lloyd’s hinged or u-shaped layout accommodates the more restrictive site while maximizing the buildable space and incredible views.

The home’s west-facing section is situated above the grade. This protrusion allows the home to blend with the surrounding terrain, and when coupled with the glass wall facade, creates a feeling of being part of the landscape.

“The Simulated Steel windows that we selected were a great choice for that, because there is a sense of scale to the windows,” says Lloyd. “But they can also be large and unobstructed, and it really allows for visibility out to the landscape.”

Given the home’s location in a higher elevation that experiences hot and dry summers with cold and snowy winters, the windows had to be high performing and extremely energy efficient. The Simulated Steel Line’s thermally broken aluminum construction and dual-paned argon-filled glass maintain a tight building envelope and consistent interior temperatures.

“We could have used steel windows here, but in this climate, the thermal performance doesn’t meet our needs,” says Lloyd. “But the Simulated Steel line works well for us. The performance was one of the prime reasons we could create large openings throughout the house.”

Simulated Steel windows throughout the house frame the landscape and let in scenic mountain views.

Simulated Steel windows throughout the house frame the landscape and let in scenic mountain views.

A delicate balance of character and scale.

Harnessing natural light and landscape were paramount to achieve both the visual and sensory requirements of the design. The couple desired the home to be a source of comfort and feel like a safe haven, according to Lloyd. It was important that its orientation, layout, and materials work together to evoke a sense of calm, ease, and tranquility.

The design had to allow for airy and open spaces that encourage gathering as well as private areas for play, rest, and relaxation. “Daylight was important, and they wanted a comfortable place where the kids could relax throughout all the seasons,” says Lloyd.

The home’s u-shaped layout creates a series of interconnected moments of light and landscape, from the kitchen and living room, to the primary bedroom and bath. Even the home gym and playroom enjoy the same incredible views as the residence’s main living spaces.

Windows occupy the majority of the home’s western-facing facade, allowing the landscape itself to become an integral part of the home’s design. They also act as a kind of frame to create an unobstructed view of the expansive terrain.

“Focusing and framing views are a central job function of an architect, and so the structure of the house should reinforce that idea of how windows not only bring in light, but they frame views,” says Lloyd.

Like a work of art, light, shape, and color work in harmony with the home’s interior — a curated selection of materials and forms that appeal to the senses while blurring the boundary between inside and outside.

Lloyd and his design team collaborated with interior design firm Studio McGee to unify the architectural design and interior spaces. Clerestory windows in the main living areas and the use of natural materials work with glass walls to establish an open and welcoming feel throughout. With the Simulated Steel windows, the team found the right mixture of detail and neutrality. “What I feel worked particularly well in this situation was that the sightlines and profile of a Simulated Steel window met our needs without adding a rustic feel,” says Lloyd. “It doesn’t impose a character on the space. It’s a subtle detail that just works.”
Rooms are filled with natural light while large windows shift focus to the outdoors.

Rooms are filled with natural light while large windows shift focus to the outdoors.

Guests are invited into a secondary entrance room by the large windows and hinged glass door.

The family looks forward to enjoying the property as a four-season retreat. The home’s courtyard-style entry, expansive Simulated Steel glass walls and windows, and clerestory windows create a modern yet cozy light-filled sanctuary all year long.

Fixed windows surrounding the bedroom create a tranquil place to sleep with a view of the greenery outside.

Fixed windows surrounding the bedroom create a tranquil place to sleep with a view of the greenery outside.

Architect Warren Lloyd, Lloyd Architects

Designer Studio McGee

Large, divided light windows and multi-slide doors connect the patio to the great room.

Simulated Steel

See the products.

Learn More

What Makes Them Great

Designed for indoor-outdoor living.

Learn More

How They’re Made

Built and tested to last.

Learn More